Foreign Objects

I may not be able to fold origami cranes to save my life, but I made these! (And by 'made' I mean painted). 

I may not be able to fold origami cranes to save my life, but I made these! (And by 'made' I mean painted). 

Call me a sentimental sucker (or a hoarder) but I have a hard time throwing away little knick-knacks that remind me of certain people or places: ticket stubs, tattered maps, half-scribbled notes, dried leaves. I can’t help myself.

Digging through a file of Korea stuff not long ago, I even found a receipt from the very first thing I ever bought when I arrived, which was a latte from Holly’s Coffee, naturally. I had only been in the country for a few hours at that point and was wandering around aimlessly exploring my new neighborhood.

  I paid for a 4,500 won coffee with a 50,000 won note. Oops. 

 

I paid for a 4,500 won coffee with a 50,000 won note. Oops. 

So yeah, I like saving things. But the problem has always been where to keep it all. Until recently, I buried these little mementoes away in a folder that also held things like copies of tax returns and instructions on how to put together all of my Ikea furniture (god forbid I ever lose the latter). But when I came home from my big summer adventure in Europe, I wanted a cute, easily-accessible spot to store all of these travel trinkets.

Where does a non-crafter turn for crafting inspiration? Pinterest, obviously. Which in turn led me here (whooo Martha Stewart!), which in turn led me to my grandma’s house, where an amazing number of craft supplies (plus an expert instructor) awaited me.

  Little Sis and I getting our crafting on with grandma

 

Little Sis and I getting our crafting on with grandma

I bought my boxes at Jo-Ann Fabrics for about $8, and my grandma had everything else. The rest is history!

 

What do you like to save or collect from your travels?